If I weren’t so lucky by Matt Butler

7 Feb

It is pretty simple……..

If my insulin was not provided for by the National Health Service from the second I was diagnosed, I would be in a lot of bother. I may even be dead. I certainly wouldn’t be married to the woman I am now.

I remember my day of diagnosis well: the nurse called me in to a small room and told me that the blood tests I’d had done did indeed confirm that I have Type 1 diabetes and I would have to inject insulin every day. As crappy as I felt (apparently I wasn’t far from being hospitalised), there was the small matter of being told to stick a needle into myself. See, at the time I could not stand needles. I still cannot watch the television if an injection is being depicted. The abject fear on my face was probably plain to see. I can’t imagine what the look on my face would have been like if the nurse had have added that every injection I did would cost me. Because when I was diagnosed I was in a pretty poorly paid job, as I was only just embarking on my journalism career. So if insulin hadn’t have been provided to me (literally there in that room, mixed 25-75 short and long-term, in a burgundy-coloured pen with a fresh shiny needle of 6 millimetres in length), I would have been faced with a pretty tough choice. Either take out crippling health insurance, pay for my insulin via unsustainable loans, or buy an air ticket home to my parents on the other side of the planet and ask them extremely nicely to fund my new needle habit. Or of course I could have just not taken it. And then died. None of the choices above would have been attractive. In fact looking at the alternatives to having insulin provided to me makes me wonder what I would have done. As well as the new world of regular blood-glucose tests, carbohydrate counting and the need for a supply of jelly babies to be kept close at hand, I’d have had to either uproot my life, take out a second job or be plunged even further into debt. Or I could have keeled over drowning in ketones.

Of course there are people in the world who do not benefit from a comprehensive state healthcare system – but still cannot afford the insulin they need to stay alive. We will ignore the accusations that pharmaceutical companies contribute to an artificially inflated insulin market, but just acknowledge the fact that insulin does cost a lot of money. And it is not as if people with diabetes have any alternative.

Spare a rose. Save a child

https://lifeforachildusa.org/

 

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One Response to “If I weren’t so lucky by Matt Butler”

  1. Rick Phillips February 8, 2018 at 3:48 am #

    I often thank people who at times swooped in to make sure i had insulin. All of us have others to thank for our good health in some way. Spare a Rose is a time to pay back the kindness

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