Tag Archives: Type2 Diabetes

Jason’s Story

15 Apr

Life is funny, one day your fitting into the smallest clothes you’ve ever been able to get into in your life and you look at yourself in the mirror and you think you look great, the next day your over 1,000km from home you’ve slept 12 hrs in five days and you just want your warm bed at home. Funny how things change so fast.

Infection is funny, you develop an infection your not quite sure of, being Gen Y you decide you don’t need a doctor you persevere and use doctor Google, he has all the answers, eventually after a period of unbearable pain you man up and go see the doctor, he gives you antibiotics and sends you on your way problem solved!!!

Wrong, it dissipates for a time and then comes back with a vengeance but you decide you don’t like doctors so your not going back, your young stupid and full of pride and ego.

But deep down something is amiss gradually over time you become more and more angry and snap at people at the drop of a hat, you start eating more and more and more drinking more and more water. People close to you suggest you might have diabetes, but you don’t want to hear it, afterall the mere thought of such a thing is scary, you saw what pig headedness did to your father with his complications from type 2 diabetes eight years previous.

Nope!!! Not me, finally after coming home from
Holidays and going another month of 0 energy and eating and drinking like a horse I finally get the courage to go and get myself looked at…. queue the microphone drop moment when the nurse sprints in, “you don’t have diabetes do you ??” Nope… “mm well now you do..” your blood sugar is supposed to be between 4-8 & yours is 26..

There’s that all consuming life Changing moment, when you realise that your life will never be the same again, you come home and start getting used to your new life and where it will take you.

But it’s not all bad, they don’t tell  you that yes in a years time you’ll get diagnosed with the beginnings of diabetic retinopathy even though your not supposed to have it for atleast five years. That originally way back when you first developed your infection you actually developed type 1.5 diabetes and that it got completely overlooked which explains the retinopathy. A year after the retinopathy you’ll also begin to develop cataracts because secretly you always wanted to be a horse…

But life works in mysterious ways… this life changing event will be the beginning of a whole new life for you. You’ll get introduced to the Australian online Diabetic community, all because you can’t work out what to eat a day after your diagnosis, you’ll come accross amazing blogs like Renza’s diabetogenic and you’ll make life long friends.

And soon before you know it you’ll meet the love of your life and your partner and type 2 diabetic Irina & you’ll both get a second chance at life and love and everything that’s good in the world and you wouldn’t change your diabetes diagnosis for anything because it’s changed and improved upon your life so much and you never want to go backwards.

Life is good, life is interesting, life is full of surprises some good and some bad, but at the end of the day we live each day the best we can and to the fullest

Jason Type 1 Diabetic Sydney Australia

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Type 2 – It’s Complicate Too

25 Feb
8.5 years. That’s how long I’ve had type 2 diabetes. I still remember the look of surprise and shock on my gynaecologist’s face, as he went through my blood test results, then:
‘Did we get you checked for BSL  at the start of your pregnancy?’
‘Yes, they were 4.9.’
‘Hmm, I’m afraid your levels are still as high as those after your Glucose Tolerance Test.’
‘What does that mean?’
‘It’s a carbohydrate intolerance and  formally a diabetes diagnosis. We’ll send you to see an endocrinologist.’
‘But how? Isn’t Gestational Diabetes supposed to be cleared, once the pregnancy is over? What is going on?’
‘In a very small number of women, it may stick by, never leaves.’

And there it was. The start of a journey that took me to so many highs and lows.

I was just discharged from a 3.5 week hospital stay, after dealing with pregnancy complications and a horrible loss. I wasn’t sure if my body could handle more blows.

I went home and had a good cry. It wasn’t fair. I was still young, sometimes slightly overweight but always active. Life had already thrown so many curveballs during that pregnancy. This was the last thing I needed.

As I slowly learned to cope, another challenge was waiting for me: the prying eyes, the food police, the never ending comments that left me feeling guilty and accused. Accused of what? Did I cause my diabetes? I was and still am trying my best and doing a good job to maintain the balance. I didn’t need that. It was already hard to keep a lid on my mental health issues, plus a host of other chronic diseases that have been tiring and draining me in their own right. Did I need or deserve these looks of disdain?

It is something when it comes from casual bystanders or ‘friends’. How about health care professionals who have barely met you, but as a type 2, you are instantly branded ‘non-compliant’, ‘closed- minded’ and ‘resistant to change’.

Over the years, my diabetes has changed. I had to see HCPs to seek advice. But that was it. I needed advice and guidance. I needed support and, may be, a pat on the back for a job well done. 8.5 years of diet and exercise controlled diabetes. Surely I deserved something positive. Alas, it wasn’t to be found in this Diabetes Educator’s office. Her claws were out to get me, to get every tiny effort I desperately made to make her see me, make her see my efforts, see my achievements and may be, if I was lucky, to congratulate me.

NOTHING!

Absolutely nothing!

I had just seen her treating her type1 patients with so much patience and tolerance. How can a change from type 1 to type 2 shift her behaviour and approach?

I was not impressed. I was hurt; deeply hurt and offended.

I left her office never to go back again.
__________________________

Irina, living with T2D, Sydney, Australia

Sliding Doors

8 Nov

Have you ever watched the film “Sliding Doors”?

Is about one person’s life as it is, and in parallel, how it could have been if one thing had happened differently.

So

How it is…..

Currently my left foot looks like this (yep, gross, but it will be fine).

IMG_1175

I have Type1 Diabetes and as a result I do my daily foot checks.

I notice a blister and keep an eye on it.

It starts to look a bit rough, so I go to the practice nurse.

She cleans and dresses it.

She refers me to the Podiatrist.

Podiatrist rings same day with an appointment (that I couldn’t make but that’s not their fault).

Great care for an amazing NHS!

 

How it could have been…..

For whatever reason I didn’t get T1D.

I get a blister on my foot.

I don’t do daily foot checks, why would I?

The blister turns bad so I stick a plaster over it.

It gets worse.

I’m a typical bloke so I leave it as I’m too busy to go to the GP.

It’s agony now so I go to the GP finally.

Foot is cleaned and dressed.

Time goes on but it gets no better.

Back to GP I go.

To cut a short story long I get diagnosed with Type2 Diabetes.

My foot issue was the first physical indication I was aware of that I had T2D

I wish I’d know that I was at risk of T2D. I can’t guarantee that I would have acted if I had, but at least Id have had a chance to………

 

Know Your Risk!….

So help yourself, your friends and family but getting them to Know Your (their) Risk of T2D, and if needed, acting on it. Please!

 

Live Long and Bolus

Grumps.